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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Report 2017-18

The school lead for Pupil Premium is Dr Andy Kirk, Vice Principal.

Contact: akirk@ketteringscienceacademy.org

 

About Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium funding was introduced by the Government to help support disadvantaged students by giving schools extra funding to enable them to take the most effective actions to improve outcomes for disadvantaged students. Reducing the gap in performance between students from backgrounds with different levels of wealth is the key function of the pupil premium. To determine the level of Pupil Premium funding the government uses Free School Meals (FSM) as an indicator of disadvantage.

Through improving the focus on individual student progress, Kettering Science Academy has introduced and is developing intervention strategies that have been proven to work successfully in other educational settings.

 

Monitoring for Impact

The Senior Leadership Team and the Local Governing Body monitor all aspects of PP.  One governor has responsibility for PP impact, and meets the Vice Principal termly to discuss strategies and impact, to ensure accountability.

 

The Main Barriers to Educational Achievement.

We have identified the following barriers to educational achievement at Kettering Science Academy for our disadvantaged pupils: low aspirations and self-belief, attendance, variable quality of classroom experience (learning and teaching), especially marking and feedback, quality of tracking of academic data, quality of individual support, and student voice – discussing students’ own ideas and using these in our planning.  The reformed GCSEs with increased academic content have also been identified as a potential barrier for PP students.

Kettering ranks 310/324 using the school social mobility indicators. The Social Commission 2017 report states “Children from disadvantaged backgrounds who go to school in former manufacturing urban areas, such as Kettering and Doncaster, have among the poorest outcomes.” 
 

The Ethos behind Pupil Premium Interventions

The purpose of Pupil Premium (PP) funding is to ensure that those students from a less privileged socioeconomic background (defined initially by their eligibility for Free School Meals at any time in the last six years) are achieving similar levels of academic progress as non-PP students. The academy is allocated an amount each April by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) depending on the number of PP students on-roll as at the January census. It is then up to the Academy to decide where this money is best spent to have the maximum impact on overall student achievement.

We recognise at KSA that whilst academic progress is the end result, our students also need – and benefit hugely from – extra-curricular activities which enhance their social, emotional and cultural lives.  We believe that this holistic approach to producing a well-rounded, responsible citizen is a major part of our responsibilities as an Academy before sending our young people out into the world beyond secondary school.

To that end, we spread the PP funding we receive across a spectrum of interventions and activities, based on need, in order to maximise its impact. These focus both on academic progress and on broadening the longer-term horizons of our students as they journey towards adulthood.

The Brooke Weston Trust PP Policy: can be found following the link:

http://www.brookewestontrust.org/_files/1E85831B4373722A2235D9FAEC8D98C8.pdf

 

Pupil Premium Strategy (as published in the academy’s School Improvement Plan)

Objective: To improve outcomes for Pupil Premium students.

A comprehensive review of PP strategy is underway.  Current priorities in our School Improvement Plan are:

·       Improve the quality of teaching and learning.

·       Improve the attendance of PP students.

·       Raise academic aspirations by introducing Minimum Expected Grades (MEGs) for all students.

·       Ensure leaders at all levels intervene to support all PP students to make at least Minimum Expected Progress.

·       Add to leadership at all levels to prioritise progress of PP students.

 

Pupil premium 2016-17:  expenditure and strategies

The total Pupil Premium grant for 2016-17 was £250,580.   The following strategies were put into place to improve student outcomes:

1. Improving Attendance and Access

The Student Support Officer (SSO) team was extended to improve the tracking of students with low attendance and provide support for them and their families. National data shows the significant impact of poor attendance on attainment and progress. Attendance continues to improve across the academy, especially that of disadvantaged students. The attendance of disadvantaged students has improved at a faster rate than for other students.

Attendance Trend – Improving

 

 

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18
(Jan 18)

% improvement

Whole School Attendance

94.47%

95.49%

95.66%

1.3% ↑

Pupil Premium Attendance

90.84%

93.57%

92.90%

3.05% ↑

Persistent Absenteeism (% students with attendance below 90%)

13.33%

9.23%

10.10%

3.23% ↓

 

2.  Careers Advice and guidance (CAEIG).

All PP students in years 10 and 11 had careers advice interviews, followed up with additional support where needed.  As a result, in 2016-17 99.5% of students had secure destinations.  Last year there were only 2 students no in education, employment or training (NEET).

2.  Safeguarding.

A full-time designated safeguarding lead supports the welfare of students in school and beyond, working with a range of external partners.

4.  Alternative Provision.

Students in KS3 had access to full-time provision with specialist support instead of normal lessons, where that was needed.  In KS4, PP students who were unable to access mainstream education were given external provision with high-quality partner organisations.

5.  Additional support for SEND PP students.

PP funding was used to provide additional support for PP SEND students, to extend the impact of the SEND strategies.

6.  Key Workers for vulnerable students .

Students with emotional, behavioural or social needs were allocated a key worker, an adult who meets them regularly for support, mentoring and advocacy. Where appropriate an educational psychologist was used, and a social skills programme provided.

7.  Resources to enable access to education.

Resources such as revision guides and uniform were provided to improve access to school and the curriculum, including extra-curricular activities.

8.  Breakfast Subsidy.

PP students were given funding to enable a free breakfast every day, to ensure they were able and prepared to access the school day fully.

9.  Progress Leaders Intervention work.

Progress leaders were trained to track and intervene, with their tutor teams, with PP students whose progress is below expectations.

10.  Additional KS4 qualifications.

The ECDL (European Computer Driving Licence) course was provided for PP students in need of improved outcomes in this area, via an external provider.

11.  Staff training.

Two training days across the year were spent on Teaching and Learning (T&L) strategies to impact on PP students.

 

A breakdown of how the Pupil Premium allocation for the 2016/2017 Academic Year was spent is as follows:

 

Interventions

Spend in 2016-17

Attendance

£25,100

Careers advice (CAEIG)

£9,850

Safeguarding and wellbeing

£18,000

Alternative Provision

£39,000

Additional SEND support

£18,000

Key Workers

£4,500

Enabling Access

£13,650

Breakfasts

£82,000

Progress Leaders' interventions

£3,000

Additional KS4 qualifications

£11,000

Additional Literacy and Numeracy intervention

£8,500

T&L training time

£18,000

 Total

£250,600


Impact.

In 2017 there was an improvement in outcomes for disadvantaged students on the Progress 8 measure, rising from -0.99 to -0.87 and moving from the 93rd percentile rank to 83rd.  This is still too low, and improving outcomes for disadvantaged students continues to be a top priority.

 

 

2015

2016

2017

2015

2016

2017

2015

2016

2017

 

All

All

All

PP

PP

PP

NPP

NPP

NPP

Overall

-0.76

-0.60

-0.53

-1.14

-0.99

-0.87

-0.62

-0.45

-0.42

English

-0.47

-0.33

-0.38

-0.74

-0.54

-0.82

-0.37

-0.24

-0.23

Maths

-0.40

-0.28

-0.22

-0.65

-0.73

-0.51

-0.31

-0.10

-0.12

Ebacc

-1.37

-0.86

-0.68

-1.74

-1.25

-0.95

-1.23

-0.70

-0.59

Open

-0.58

-0.75

-0.70

-1.14

-1.21

-1.07

-0.38

-0.57

-0.58

(Note there was a change from IGCSE English to (1-9) GCSE without coursework in 2017.)

All students

2015

2016

2017

% A*-C English (Grade 4+)

67

iGCSE

70

iGCSE

67

 % A*-C Maths (Grade 4+)

54

67

64

% A*-C Basics (Grade 4+)

51

60

55

 

 

 

 

% A*-B English (Grade 5+)

24

41

51

% A*-B Maths (Grade 5+)

31

35

36

% A*-B Basics (Grade 5+)

23

29

30

 

 

 

 

% A*-A English (Grade 7+)

8

16

13

% A*-A Maths (Grade 7+)

10

16

10

% A*-A Basics (Grade 7+)

4

9

5

 

 

 

 

Disadvantaged students

2015

2016

2017

% A*-C English (Grade 4+)

61

57

47

% A*-C Maths (Grade 4+)

46

53

42

% A*-C Basics (Grade 4+)

44

43

31

 

 

 

 

% A*-B English (Grade 5+)

20

28

27

% A*-B Maths (Grade 5+)

30

22

16

% A*-B Basics (Grade 5+)

20

17

10

 

 

 

 

% A*-A English (Grade 7+)

6

15

5

% A*-A Maths (Grade 7+)

14

11

5

% A*-A Basics (Grade 7+)

6

8

2

 

 

 

 

Non-disadvantaged students

2015

2016

2017

% A*-C English (Grade 4+)

69

76

75

% A*-C Maths (Grade 4+)

56

73

71

% A*-C Basics (Grade 4+)

52

68

63

 

 

 

 

% A*-B English (Grade 5+)

25

46

58

% A*-B Maths (Grade 5+)

31

41

42

% A*-B Basics (Grade 5+)

24

34

36

 

 

 

 

% A*-A English (Grade 7+)

9

16

16

% A*-A Maths (Grade 7+)

9

19

11

% A*-A Basics (Grade 7+)

4

10

5

 

Pupil premium allocation for the academic year 2017-18

The amount for 2017-2018 as advised by the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) is £244,970.


How we intend to spend the allocation in 2017-18

Following evaluation of the impact in 2016-17, the following changes have been planned:

Teaching and Learning (T&L):  the evidence shows that the impact of high quality teaching and learning is greatest on PP students, as is the impact of high quality Assessment, Marking and Feedback (AMF).  As a result new T&L and AMF strategies have been put in place.  Two new Assistant Principals have been appointed to lead these two strategy areas.

Year 11 outcomes for PP students were not good enough, so a new Assistant Principal has been appointed to be a Raising Standards Leader to lead on our year 11 strategy.

A Senior Student Support Officer has been appointed to further improve attendance and participation.

A system of Minimum Expected Grades (MEGs) has been put in place for all years, to ensure all students and parents are aware of what level students should be working at – ie what ‘average progress’ looks like for each student.  MEGs are a minimum expectation, so students are encouraged to aspire to the highest possible grades.

Progress Mentors have been put in place in each year to work with students who are not making expected progress.

To support students at risk of permanent exclusion or in need of re-integration into mainstream education, a new facility called the ‘Hub’ has been created, staffed by an HTLA.

 

How the school will measure the impact of the pupil premium?

All students’ progress is captured and reported at 4 Progress Checks (PC) throughout the academic year (PC1 to PC4). The progress of pupil premium students is tracked by the Senior Leadership Team, Progress Leaders, Progress Mentors, the Raising Standards Leader, Heads of Department and classroom teachers.


A Final Thought

Kettering Science Academy appreciates that many parents do not apply for Free School Meals (FSM) but now more than ever it can clearly be seen to have educational advantages for individual students for a number of years through their school career. FSM eligibility is more than a meal at lunchtime, and the benefits for those students eligible are now much more, spanning a period of at least six years from the initial allowance.

We would encourage all parents who may be eligible for FSM to pursue this support avenue. It could help children considerably whilst they are at school and give them access to many more opportunities.

If you are unsure as to the benefits, please do not hesitate to give us a call.