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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium

Section 1:  Summary, 2016-17

Section 2:  Impact on results in external examinations.

Section 3:  How the pupil premium allocation was spent in 2015-16.

Section 4:  Pupil Premium Expenditure 2015-2016

Section 5:  Impact on outcomes in 2017

 

Section 1:  Summary, 2016-17

The amount of the school’s allocation of pupil premium grant is £250, 580.

The school lead for Pupil Premium is Dr A Kirk, Vice Principal. 

Contact: akirk@ketteringscienceacademy.org

 

The main barriers to educational achievement.

At Kettering Science Academy we have identified the following as key barriers to be addressed:  aspirations, use of academic data to track PP students, quality of teaching (although 80% of teaching is now good or better), especially marking and feedback, student voice, regarding students’ own needs.  The reformed GCSEs with increased academic content have also been identified as a potential barrier for PP students.

How the allocation will be spent to address the barriers and why these approaches were taken

The key area for action in 2016-17 is using the academic and other data we have to plan and impact on the achievement of PP students.  All middle leaders, both subject leaders and progress leaders, plan actions for PP students who are underperforming after each progress check (4 times per year).  These actions are reviewed, so that best practice is identified and shared across the Academy.

The strategies outlined as used in 2015-16 will also continue.  These fall into two groups: (1) whole school approaches which affect all students, but affect PP students most strongly (for example, improving the quality of feedback) and (2) strategies which impact PP students directly (eg tracking and intervention, one-to-one support).  Student voice, identified as an area for development, will contribute to the review of these strategies.  The aim will be to combine the latest research with a clear understanding of what works at Kettering Science Academy.

These approaches have been adopted based on national research (primarily the Sutton Trust and Education Endowment Foundation research) and identifying needs based on rigorous self-evaluation.

The following strategies are in place in 2016-17 – see section 3 for further detail:

 

Strategy

A  Progress leaders working with each year group.

B  Improving attendance and access

C  Learning Support Assistants

C.2  SEN provision

D  CIAEG

E  After-school provision / enrichment

F  Sports and Arts Extra Curricular Offer

G  Literacy and Numeracy Intervention for KS3 Students (McGraw-Hill)

H  Numeracy one-to-one and small group work.

I  Peer tutoring

J  Access support

K  Additional breakfast subsidy

L  Emotional and Social support

M  Culturally Rich funded activities

N  Progress groups

O  Alternative provision

P  Student voice

Q  Race to the Top / Provision for students with high prior attainment

R  Governance support and challenge

S  Consistent tracking of individuals and groups

T  Brooke Weston Trust Disadvantaged Network

 

 

How the school will measure the impact of the pupil premium

All students’ progress is assessed at 4 ‘progress checks’ through the year.  Pupil premium students’ progress is tracked by the Senior Leadership Team, year-group Progress Leaders, Subject Leaders and classroom teachers.

The date of the next pupil premium strategy review.

The Pupil Premium Review document was last updated in June 2016, and will be reviewed again in June 2016.

 

Section 2:  Impact on results in external examinations.

The progress of Pupil Premium students, and all students, rose from 2014 to 15, and again in 2016 as shown below.  (Data correct as of 1st September 2016).  There have been many individual successes with pupils who are in receipt of the Pupil Premium and some have made excellent progress.

 

 

2015-16

2014-15
 

Pupil Premium Students

All Students

Pupil Premium Students

All Students

5 A*-C

43%

58%

41%

48%

5 A*-C, including English and maths

42%

57%

39%

45%

3+ levels of progress in English

69%

72%

58%

67%

3+ levels of progress in maths

49%

65%

49%

55%

3+ levels of progress in science

50%

60%

72%

78%

English Baccalaureate

14%

19%

14%

17%

Average capped point score

242

281

237

262

Average total point score

273

325

274

306

A/A* (percentage of total number of GCSE grades)

13%

14%

13%

11%

1 modern foreign language (% students gaining C+)

25%

24%

20%

23%

 

 

 

 

 

Key Stage 5

Success rate

67%

77%

61%

65%

Retention rate

73%

80%

61%

66%

Achievement rate

91%

96%

100%

99%

 

Section 3:  How the pupil premium allocation was spent in 2015-16.

The total Pupil Premium grant for 2015-16 was £267,735.  A range of strategies was put into place, as follows:

 

Progress Leaders

•Strategy: progress coordinators in place to work with classroom teachers and students to monitor and track student progress. The focus is on supporting vulnerable students.

•Impact: close learning gaps and ensuring appropriate feedback is in place for these students.

Improving Attendance and Access

•Strategy: welfare support for students and families with low attendance. National data shows the significant impact of poor attendance on attainment and progress.

•Impact: improved attendance for specific students and overall attendance for 2014-15 of 94% for the Academy as a whole. The figure for attendance for pupil premium students in 2014-15 was 93.0%. (increase of 1.5% on 2014-2015)

 

Learning Support Assistants

•Strategy: increased in-class and small group support from LSAs to further personalise and support learning of students. The use of learning support assistants at the Academy is targeted and takes into account a range of research.

•Impact: sustained outcomes for students including those with additional educational needs.

 

Careers Information, Advice and Guidance

•Strategy: Early and additional guidance is offered to vulnerable students eligible for the Pupil Premium Grant to ensure that they can be supported to pursue aspirational futures. Ofsted research highlights the vital importance of impartial and effective careers advice.

•Impact: timely advice data shows one Year 11 student from 2014-2015 was NEET with many of these students pursuing 6th Form courses that will enable them to attend universities, including Russell Group universities.

 

Interventions to Support Progress

After School Provision

•Strategy: personalised support after school is available to all Year 11 students eligible for the Pupil Premium Grant to enable them to maximise examination results.

•Impact: high levels of attendance after school across a range of year 11 students (including PP students). Attainment of Pupil Premium students has improved from 2014 to 2016.

 

Literacy and Numeracy Intervention for KS3 Students

•Strategy: McGraw Hill Reading and Numeracy Intervention. This intensive programme is targeted at key groups in the Academy in years 7 and 8 in order to close learning gaps. A skilled team of experienced staff deliver the programme, adapting it if necessary to support student progress.

•Impact: good teaching and learning within McGraw Hill groups with progress monitored via tracking and case studies.

•Strategy: one to one/small group Maths tuition for students who are identified as not making enough progress within Maths.

•Impact: gaps in levels of attainment in Maths continue to narrow.

 

Sports and Arts Extra Curricular Offer

•Strategy: After school activities, including sports and the Arts, which are open to all students.

•Impact: increased aspiration and involvement of all groups of students in the wider life of the Academy.

 

Access Support

•Strategy: bespoke financial support on a case by case basis for pupil premium students in order to enable access to a range of activities and resources.

•Impact: support for PP students to enable them to overcome any barriers to participation in the wider life of the Academy.

 

Emotional and Well-Being Support

•Strategy: personalised emotional support for students who need this to overcome barriers to learning. In line with guidance, support is targeted for impact. Case studies and student feedback will enable monitoring.

•Impact: Improved engagement in lessons and with the wider life of the Academy.

 

 Culturally Rich Funded Activities

•A number of partly funded places for pupil premium students to attend the Schools Prom and to take part in extracurricular activities. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation emphasises the importance of structured and varied extra-curricular activities which help to close disadvantage gaps.

•Impact: increased range of cultural experiences and creating an aspirational culture for all groups of students.

 

Section 4:  Pupil Premium Expenditure 2015-2016

  

Description

Cost

HLTA intervention, including one to one, key worker support and academic mentoring.

£93,127.00

Social, Emotional Support Work

Reducing barriers to education to enable students to engage fully with quality first teaching.

£33,200.16

Welfare and attendance

 To increase levels of engagement and attendance

£22,091.73

English Small Group Intervention

£15,561.00

Alternative Provision (P/T)

£18,945.00

Home Study Programme/Parent training

£4,750.00

Maths Small Group Teaching

£13,910.00

After School Provision, including homework club.

£26,637.00

FSM Subsidy

£35,568.00

Alternative Provision KS4

£19,419.40

Year 10 Intervention

£3,637.10

Learning support

£7,498.99

Total

£267,735.00


 

Section 5:  Impact on outcomes in 2017

The replacement of A*-G with 1-9 GCSEs in English and Maths, and the higher requirement of basics and EBac (grade 5, not C), and a change of points from 2016 to 2017 make comparisons between 2016 and 2017 results problematic.  However, these are the predictions (in May 2017) for outcomes of PP students in 2017:

 

Academic

2017

2016

Basics

36%/24% (4+/5+)

46%

Attainment 8

35.5 (2017 points)

36.8 (2016 points)

Progress 8

-0.55

-0.88

Ebacc

11%

14%

 

Attendance

Rate

2015/16

90.84%

2016/17 (May 2017)

93.60%

 

Exclusions

All

PP

2013-14

587

200

2014-15

393

121

2015-16

208

46

2016-17 (Dec 2016)

51

7